Tagged: async

Converting akka scala futures to java futures

Back in akka land! I’m using the ask pattern to get results back from actors since I have a requirement to block and get a result (I can’t wait for an actor to push at a later date). Thats fine, but converting from scala futures to java completable futures is a pain. I also, (like mentioned in another post) want to make sure that my async responses capture and set the MDC for proper logging.

My final usage should look something like:

private <Response, Request> Future<Response> askActorForResponseAsync(Request source) {
    final FiniteDuration askTimeout = new FiniteDuration(config.getAskForResultTimeout().toMillis(), TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);

    final Timeout timeout = new Timeout(askTimeout);

    final scala.concurrent.Future<Object> ask = Patterns.ask(master.getActor(), new PersistableMessageContext(source), timeout);

    return FutureConverter.fromScalaFuture(ask)
                          .executeOn(actorSystem.dispatcher())
                          .thenApply(i -> (Response) i);
}

The idea is that I’m going to translate a scala future with a callback into a completable future java promise.

Next up, the future converter:

public class FutureConverter {
    public static <T> 
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Creating futures

Futures (and promises) are a fun and useful design pattern in that they help encapsulate asynchronous work into composable objects. That and they help hide away the actual asynchronous execution implementation. It doesn’t matter if the future is finally resolved on the threadpool, in a new thread, or in an event loop (like nodejs).

Asynchronous work wrapped in futures has garnered a lot of attention in the javascript world since they alleviate the heavy use of nested callbacks to return a final result. But futures aren’t limited to just javascript, the C# async keyword is a form of a future, Java has a futures class, and a lot of other languages have the ability to use futures.

In order to to demystify the concept of Futures lets build own version. Futures aren’t hard to implement, even when you have a language that doesn’t have them built in (or if you … Read more

Single producer many consumer

When I’m bored, I like to roll my own versions of things that already exist. That’s not to say I use them in production, but I find that they are great learning tools. If you read the blog regularly you probably have realized I do this A LOT. Anyways, today is no different. I was thinking about single producer, multiple consumer functions, like an SNS Topic, but for your local machine. In reality, the best way to do this would be to publish your event through an Rx stream and consume it with multiple subscribers, but that’s no fun. I want to roll my own!

BlockingCollection in .NET supports thread safe multiple consumers, but only 1 item will ever get dequeued from your collection. That means that if you have multiple threads waiting on a consuming enumerable, only one of them will get a result (not all of them). That’s … Read more